Language101.com

How to Not Fail at Language Learning

Here’s the sad truth about language learning. “Most people who try to learn a language fail.”

There are two primary reasons for this failure and when you understand these reasons you will be well on your way to success.

The First Reason for Failure

The first reason is that they try to use inefficient methods that have a minimum effective study time that is much greater than the student can possibly spend.

Traditional study methods of the type that you will be encouraged to use in a typical Spanish class in high school require a minimum “dose” of study of about four hours per day and honest language teachers will tell you that.

If you plan to use traditional inefficient methods, (which will work if applied diligently enough) you should plan on spending at least 20 hours per week studying your new language and believe me, more is better.

You need this amount of study time each week, because with traditional methods, you will be making low quality memories which form slowly and fade quickly and if you can’t spend 20 hours a week using traditional methods for learning Spanish, you might as well not even bother.

The Second Main Reason for Language Learning Failure

The saddest thing in language learning for me is that even people who have discovered efficient and effective language learning methods like the ones we offer at Language101.com also usually fail.

With our methods a 30 minute study session at least five times per week is enough to make excellent progress in your new language. With our methods, you need to spend a much more realistic 2.5 hours per week and you will still make good progress.

But people fail because they don’t even spend that 2.5 hours of study time per week.

With Language101.com you will be using study methods that build high-quality memories that form quickly and fade slowly, but you still have to sit down and consistently study to learn Spanish or any language. You can’t do it while watching Netflicks.

Would A Live Teacher Help You?

I’ve always been a big advocate of having humans do what they are good at and have computers do what they are good at. Our software is very good at serving up well crafted phrases at exactly the right time to re-wire your brain to understand Spanish or your new language. But our program is not that good at motivating you and encouraging you. Friendly language teachers are much better at that.

You Can Do It – We Will Cheer For You!

We are now testing a new offering where our language teachers will call you up to five days per week on the days you prefer to be called on, check to make sure that you are still studying, answer and answer any specific software questions you may have and then quickly get out of your way and let the software do it’s magic of re-wiring your brain.

The price for this service is $100.00 per month (cancel any time) for your choice of up to five calls per week. These are not telephone language lessons (your teacher may not be an expert in the language you are learning), these are fast, encouragement and reminder calls that are intended to cheer for you and encourage you in a way that live teachers are really good at but computer programs aren’t.

Your teacher will be able to see your study history and quickly point out any mistakes that you are making with our software.

We will bill you for this service at the time you sign up and every month after that until you cancel and you can cancel any time. You can cancel any time. Payments are not refundable.

It’s important to make time for someone to cheer for you.

We Call This Cheering

Since this is a new feature, we don’t have it programmed into our checkout process, so if you want to sign up, please use our contact-us form and tell us you want to sign up for cheering.

For existing customers we will bill your credit card number and call you to get you set up. For new customers, please check using our online store, then contact-us and tell us that you want us to start cheering you for.

 

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